Trends and Data Updates

2016

Trends in College Spending, 2003–2013 examines college and university finances during one of the most turbulent economic periods in decades. Like previous Trends in College Spending reports, this update is meant to aid readers in developing a deeper understanding of how colleges collect and spend money and the outcomes they produce.

2015

The Delta Cost Project Database is updated with 2012-2013 data. These data have been translated into analytical formats to allow for longitudinal analyses of trends in postsecondary education, with a focus on revenues and expenditures.

TCS Online is updated with 2007-2012 data. This user-friendly data tool provides information on revenues, spending, and outcomes for individual colleges and universities and for the U.S. 

The updated Delta Cost Project Database, 1987-2012, which includes two new years of data, has been released by the National Center for Education Statistics.

2014

This Trends in College Spending update presents national-level estimates for the Delta Cost Project data metrics during the period 2001–2011. The updated analysis finds, among other things, that subsidies for public higher education institutions have hit a 10-year low, while students for the first time pay on average half or more of their education's cost.

2012

This series of data updates uses data from the IPEDS Analytics: Delta Cost Project Database 1987–2010, which was released in August 2012 by the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. The intent of these briefs is to update key tables and figures from Trends in College Spending: Where Does the Money Come From? Where Does It Go? What Does It Buy?

2011

This report contributes to the improvement of the public accountability of higher education spending by contextualizing it, showing how money is spent and how that spending relates to institutional performance. The findings in the report concentrate on the 1999 to 2009 academic years.

2010

This report contributes to the improvement of the public accountability of higher education spending by contextualizing it, showing how money is spent and how that spending relates to institutional performance. The findings in the report concentrate on the 1998 to 2008 academic years.